Laughing Along With A Limerick

Here’s to a great week! Your new limerick challenge is as follows:

SCONE

Your challenge last week was to write a limerick using the word HELL in it somewhere. Here are your masterpieces:

Keith Edgar Channing:

No words can describe the foul smell

Of a hermit crab, dead in its shell.

If you find one of those

Just cover your nose

And ask just what is this fresh hell.

Annette Rochelle Aben:

They rang the bell

When from grace she fell

No longer on top

Hitting the ground with a plop

Exclaiming, “What fresh hell?”

Ritu:

Jill looked into the well

Precisely where he fell

She called out “Oh, Jack!”

But there was no voice back

“Our mum’s going to give me hell!”

Christine Mallband-Brown:

I’ve had a hell of a cold

It’s made me feel really quite old

Coughing and sneezing

Hacking and wheezing

A remedy, I need to be sold!

Kim Smyth:

I think that Hell will be cold

So uncomfortable when you’re old

Craving warm weather

Get rid of this sweater

Baring skin isn’t just for the bold!

Trent’s World:

Can you look at my bill, please?

It is full of unexplained fees

That’s quite a lot

For who knows what

Before I pay, Hell will freeze.

I see you didn’t like it a bit

Me and my unhinged wit

You say it’s crude

And sometimes rude

But I shan’t go to Hell for it.

TanGental:

Commuting is the worst kind of hell

Which can leave you distinctly unwell

You’ll soon be believing

That stopping breathing

Is better than some second-hand smell.

Val Fish:

Hell hath no fury, its said

As that woman scorned, I saw red

I kicked him out the door

And as for his whore

I kicked her right out of my bed!

Ruth Scribbles:

I only tried to wish her well

She thought I said, “You go to hell.”

The look I got

Hurt a lot

‘Cause I tripped and fell in a well.

Linking People 2003:

Oh, hell, will end of burka practice end sobriety?

Yes, because burka allays beauty anxiety,

Among women; subdues voyeuristic pleasure,

For men, preventing violence without measure,

Against women around the globe, notoriety!

***

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35 Responses to Laughing Along With A Limerick

  1. I looked up into the bright blue sky
    And what did I spy with my little eye
    A drone with a scone
    And an ice-cream cone
    Dost thou think that I might be high?

    Liked by 5 people

  2. trentpmcd says:

    Little Anita went to see
    If she could score a scone and a sip-of tea
    She felt real bad
    For none was to be had
    Without an exorbitant few

    Liked by 5 people

  3. We went out for tea and a scone
    Just me and my bestest mate, John.
    I then shared a scone
    With a girl that I’d known
    But before I had finished, she’d gone.

    Liked by 5 people

  4. Kim Smyth says:

    I once at a scone with a bone
    Or was it a seed or a stone?
    At any rate
    The taste was not great
    I’ll just stick to biscuits from one on!

    Liked by 4 people

  5. Jam and cream on a scone
    Or with just butter, alone?
    You get to choose it
    Which choice will it fit?
    But a scone alone? I’d moan!

    Liked by 2 people

  6. There was a fair maiden from Troon
    Who fell for a crooner from Scone.
    He woo’d her with tunes
    That just made her swoon.
    Now they’re an item: they’re Kenneth and June.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. And now an acrostic

    Sometimes, when I’m chewing a scone,
    Can’t help but think, “What’s going on?
    Once young, fit and free,
    Now I’m seventy-three,
    Even… no, it’s too late; the thought’s gone.”

    Liked by 2 people

  8. TanGental says:

    For some, jam first is just not done,
    While cream first, you’re on your own.
    The bigger dilemma
    Is really whether
    You call it a ‘scon’ or a ‘scown’.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. Pingback: The Most Divisive Issue In England Today #limerick | TanGental

  10. Linkingpeople2003 says:

    SCONE, a cake 🧁 made from flour, fat, milk 🥛 and fruit,
    Usually unsweetened or lightly so is the pursuit!
    But, Australians use “scone” word as a slang,
    For head, expressing as, tapped his scone, with pang;
    To imply, couldn’t understand the new recruit!

    Liked by 1 person

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