The Strange Workings Of The English Language Part Nine

Here is part nine in my new series, where I take a look at the weird and wonderful world of words. If you missed part one, please click here. You’ll find part two here and part three here. For part four click here. Now for parts five, six, seven and eight.

Q. What’s the difference between the words ‘adverse’ and ‘averse’?

A. Adverse means unfavourable/harmful. It tends to be used to describe conditions and effects e.g.:

The weather had no adverse effect on the harvest this year.

Averse means to be opposed to/having a strong dislike e.g.:

I am not averse to doing the washing up.

Interesting word of the week:

AGELAST

Meaning: Someone who never laughs.

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sun

Photo credit: pinterest.com

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8 Responses to The Strange Workings Of The English Language Part Nine

  1. Reblogged this on Author Don Massenzio and commented:
    Check out this post from Esther Chilton’s blog with The Strange Workings Of The English Language Part Nine

  2. Simon says:

    The two get confused becasue they sound alike. I’ve not heard of Agelast before…
    I hope you’re well 🙂

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